Archives for posts with tag: brainstorm

Print. Cut. Shuffle. For brainstorming better interactions.

The xD Idea Deck is a compilation of game mechanics, rules, and social touchpoints to help generate novel interactions, experiences, and services.

The suggested method is to combine the xD Idea Deck with a card sorting exercise—write out all the issues surrounding a particular brand, service, or product, then use the xD Idea Deck as cogs between those cards. Or, simply draw random cards from each type and combine them to form novel interactions.

The xD Idea Deck comes as a print-ready PDF–complete with crop marks. Send it to a printer and have them do all the work.

Download for Free: xD Idea Deck v1.3 (1.3M PDF)

Version History:

1.3: Reworked for easy printing. Now with crop marks!
1.2: Prettified the card art.
1.1: Added ‘Rules’ deck, and properly recategorized many cards as ‘rules.’ Added ‘versus’ cards. Eliminated ‘crowdsourcing’ and ‘appointment dynamic’ because they were redundant.

Advertisements

Even as much as Social strategy is the hot topic these days, I still find many people and clients who don’t understand how important simple Social tactics are for any online interactive or communication. I’ve spoken with many clients who mistrust Social engagements, feel they aren’t ready for them, don’t want to put their brand out on a limb to be scrutinized, think it is too risky, too expensive, or too much trouble. Really, Social doesn’t have to be expensive or even expansive, but it should probably be pervasive.

It’s clear that many people think that Social strategy is just restating the obvious and doesn’t require any special attention (I’ve heard the same about Information Architecture). In point of fact, I’ve sat through and given presentations on the infamous social technographics ladder, and the truth is that many people don’t really understand what the fuss is about.

The overarching message most people take home is: People love to comment and share on the internet, so you need to get into “The Conversation” and throw up some “Share This” and “Like” buttons on everything. I happen to think this is a tragically generic response to a complicated challenge which warrants a more tactical approach.

Another way to look at it:

Read the rest of this entry »