Archives for category: Cruftnotes

Print. Cut. Shuffle. For brainstorming better interactions.

The xD Idea Deck is a compilation of game mechanics, rules, and social touchpoints to help generate novel interactions, experiences, and services.

The suggested method is to combine the xD Idea Deck with a card sorting exercise—write out all the issues surrounding a particular brand, service, or product, then use the xD Idea Deck as cogs between those cards. Or, simply draw random cards from each type and combine them to form novel interactions.

The xD Idea Deck comes as a print-ready PDF–complete with crop marks. Send it to a printer and have them do all the work.

Download for Free: xD Idea Deck v1.3 (1.3M PDF)

Version History:

1.3: Reworked for easy printing. Now with crop marks!
1.2: Prettified the card art.
1.1: Added ‘Rules’ deck, and properly recategorized many cards as ‘rules.’ Added ‘versus’ cards. Eliminated ‘crowdsourcing’ and ‘appointment dynamic’ because they were redundant.

I developed this application to help evaluate concepts, stories, or messaging against six factors: Simplicity, Concreteness, Credibility, Emotion, Unexpectedness, and Narrative. It produces an estimated “Concept Stickiness” value and fingerprint for qualitative comparison.

I am still working to provide more contextual help and guidance within the utility.

This work is derived from the framework described in Chip and Dan Heath’s book “Made to Stick” as well as Malcolm Gladwell’s articulation in “The Tipping Point.”

The CSM is a work in progress. Please submit comments or suggestions.

Client Approval and the Backwards Waterfall diagram

Every step forward you take in a waterfall process, you’ll inevitably end up re-litigating decisions of the past. A designer, for example, must expect clients to renegotiate context and architecture through the designs, even if they may already have been ‘approved.’

It flat-out appears to be human nature. Your client, or anyone for that matter, will try to play by the rules of your process, but they will usually lack enough information to actually give informed approval. Despite this, they will give tempered approval in the interest of time, but also continue to gather more information so they can make up their mind(s) later.

The only time most clients will have a high degree of comfort giving final approval is on launch day when they simply can’t delay any longer.

Consumer technologies (from the physical to webservice) follow a simple and very predictable cycle, based on the following consumer demands.

  1. Give me what I want.
  2. Give it to me whenever I want it.
  3. Give it to me wherever I want it.
  4. And when I have too much, help me to filter and manage it.

Walkmans truly gave us music wherever we wanted it

They don’t always play out in that order, but I consider these to be the key drivers for the majority of consumer-facing technologies. They are universal and not dictated by price.

Pre-transistor, most technologies were stuck at stage one or two. If you wanted some entertainment, you bought a ticket to a show and drove to the theater. But at least you could pop a record onto your gramophone, allowing you to listen to music whenever you wanted and in your own home. But a gramophone wasn’t particularly portable. We’d have to wait decades for the walkman before we could take our music jogging. Sony was there first, and they reaped the vast treasure for their innovation. Read the rest of this entry »